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December 19, 2018

Wednesday's Daily Pulse

What you need to know about Florida today

| 9/26/2018

Big money backs Florida ballot measures

Florida voters this fall could decide the fate of 12 ballot proposals that deal with issues ranging from limiting taxes to banning greyhound racing. Behind the scenes, businesses and organizations have already spent tens of millions of dollars as they try to pass — or defeat — some of the proposed constitutional amendments. More from WJXT and the Tampa Bay Business Journal.

Related Florida Trend Content
» Florida's constitutional amendments are a mixed bag

Florida Trend Exclusive
Energy updates: Nuclear, coal and gas

IRSC students

Indian River State College has succeeded at supplying a new cohort of nuclear plant workers across the U.S. In the photo at right, IRSC students work on a reactor coolant pump seal. See that story, "Nuclear Option," here. Plus, energy snapshots from around Florida, including:

  • Sell JEA? An advisory firm suggests JEA could get top dollar from a private buyer.
  • Big Switch: Gulf Power employees and customers await announcements from NextEra about the company’s strategy in Northeast Florida.
  • Nuclear Reaction: FPL moves forward with plans for two nuclear reactors that might not be built.
  • Rising Star: A UCF physicist lands a coveted federal ‘early career’ grant.
  • Cleaning Up: Duke is on the verge of replacing two coal plants with a natural gas plant.

» See the full report here.

Utilities helped Puerto Rico fix its power grid. Now they face hefty tax bills.

When nearly the entire power grid of Puerto Rico was knocked out by a pair of ferocious hurricanes, utility companies from Florida and across the country sent crews and equipment to help. The companies were not earning a profit. So it was with astonishment that some of the companies received bills from the towns where they had worked in Puerto Rico demanding millions of dollars in license and construction taxes. [Source: New York Times]

Florida filled with hundreds of invasive, dangerous animal species

More than 500 non-native, invasive fish and wildlife species live and thrive in Florida, says the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. From iguanas to Burmese pythons to lion fish and giant African snails, these exotic creatures and many plants threaten the state's native species, causing economic damage and posing a threat to human health and safety. [Source: Orlando Sentinel]

Florida Election 2018
Nelson opens up sizable lead on Scott in new poll

Nelson-Scott

After months of polls showing a virtual dead heat, Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson has opened up a sizable 7-point lead on Gov. Rick Scott in a new survey released Tuesday by Quinnipiac University. Conducted Thursday through Monday, the poll found 53 percent of likely voters backed Nelson while 46 percent favored Scott in one of the most closely watched Senate races in the country. See the Q-poll results here. Also read more at WPLG, the Tampa Bay Times, and the Orlando Sentinel.

ALSO AROUND FLORIDA:

› Lockheed Martin hopes new Orlando lab inspires workforce, attracts future employees
Lockheed Martin pulled up the curtain on a new innovation lab Tuesday, showing off 3D printers, virtual and augmented reality headsets and a robotics lab meant to encourage its employees to experiment. Also read more at the Orlando Sentinel.

› Ground beef recall includes meat sold at Florida Target stores
Florida Target stores are among those locations that received ground beef products recalled due to possible E. coli contamination. The U.S. Department of Agriculture released a list of retail locations that took delivery of the products involved in last week's Cargill Meat Solutions recall covering more than 132,000 pounds of ground beef.

› 1900s naval hangars will be transformed into destination spot in Coconut Grove
Historic U.S. naval hangars that date back to the early 1900s will be transformed into a destination spot known as Regatta Harbour in Coconut Grove. The TREO Group, a real estate investment firm, announced this week it closed on a $33 million loan provided by FirstBank of Florida for the construction.

› Sanford company faces $6.5M in penalties for disabling vehicles' emissions controls
The government says a Sanford company will spend more than $6 million in penalties and repair costs for selling computer software that disables automotive emissions controls. The Justice Department and Environmental Protection Agency say that Derive Systems sold 363,000 products that violated the Clean Air Act.

Go to page 2 for more stories ...

Tags: Daily Pulse, Afternoon Pulse

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Climate gentrification: Is sea rise turning Miami high ground into a hot commodity?
Climate gentrification: Is sea rise turning Miami high ground into a hot commodity?

Miami is the first city to study the impacts of climate gentrification, a shift in consumer preferences for higher ground as climate change sends sea levels rising that displaces residents in Miami’s few high elevation communities.

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