REGIONS

September 19, 2019
Teaching in Florida vs. around the world

Photo:

Florida Trend Education

Teaching in Florida vs. around the world

| 6/13/2019

Florida Trend Exclusive
Teaching in Florida vs. around the world

A decade ago, FLORIDA TREND interviewed high school students in foreign countries, looking for a sense of how their school lives compared with those of Florida students. This year — as pay and working conditions for teachers nationwide draw increasing attention — TREND set out to do the same with teachers in foreign countries. We asked them about their training. Class sizes. Pay. Working conditions.

See how Florida's teachers' work lives compare with those in other countries:

FINLAND
Finnish Line: The country known for having the best teachers doesn't pay them at premium levels but makes sure it hires the right people ... and doesn't micromanage them.

BRAZIL
Five Stories...: The country's teacher corps is young and must work with big classes and widely varying work conditions.

CANADA
Popular Profession: Canadian schools are picky about who gets to teach.

IRELAND
Challenging, But Rewarding: While desireable, teaching in Ireland has gotten tougher, with starting salaries still at pre-2008 levels.

JAPAN
Overworked: The burden of Japan's high performance rests on its teachers.

INDIA
Late to the Game: India only recently made education a fundamental right.

ISRAEL
An Earlier Start: Israel made school mandatory for 3 and 4 year olds in 2012.

FLORIDA
One Last Chance: Teaching is a dream come true for Alexa Abbate, but classroom challenges are testing her.

New bylaws could split UF, IFAS citrus research group

The University of Florida and its Board of Trustees is considering new regulations that would require its affiliates -- such as the Citrus Research and Development Foundation -- spend 100% of their money within the university and exclusively for its benefit. with no diversity in research, that regualtion, foundation leaders believe, would hinder the fight against citrus greening. More from the Lakeland Ledger and the Gainesville Sun.

Appeals court weighs major Florida education law

Appearing skeptical of arguments made by school boards, an appeals court Tuesday waded into a challenge to the constitutionality of a 2017 state law that seeks to boost charter schools. Numerous school boards across the state filed two lawsuits contending that the law infringed on their rights to operate school districts. [Source: WJXT]

Opinion: Florida asked parents, teachers, experts if schools need new standards. Almost everyone said no. Florida is doing it anyway.

For years, many of us have argued that the politicians and bureaucrats in charge of Florida’s public schools don’t listen. They don’t listen to parents, to teachers, to students — not even to education experts who know far more than they do. Now we have proof. [Source: South Florida Sun-Sentinel]

Two Florida teachers unions face decertification under new law

Florida lawmakers in 2018 included a provision in a massive omnibus education bill that requires unions representing school district employees be de-certified as collective bargaining units if less than 50 percent of its “instructional personnel” don’t pay dues. As a right-to-work state, Florida forbids requiring employees to join organized labor organizations, or pay dues, in order to be represented by unions in bargaining with school districts and the state. [Source: ]

ALSO AROUND FLORIDA:

› Anthony Eudelio Varona named dean of University of Miami School of Law
Anthony Eudelio Varona, an attorney and educator who specializes in administrative law, communications and media law, and sexuality and gender law, has been named the new dean at the University of Miami School of Law. Varona is currently professor of law at American University Washington College of Law, where he teaches contracts, administrative and public law, and media law, and serves as faculty advisor to the Latino/a Law Students Association, and the Lambda Law Society.

› Nearly 200 Florida schools don't have armed security. Now, those districts may get called out
After a state commission found out Wednesday that nearly 200 schools — including many charter schools — have not had armed security as required by state law, commissioners urged the Florida Department of Education to “name names and name people” to try to force compliance.

› Florida State scores 10 U.S. Fulbright student awards
en outstanding Florida State University graduate students and recent alumni will spend the 2019-2020 academic year teaching English or conducting research projects abroad as a part of the Fulbright U.S. Student Program. The program, administered by the Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, offers grants for graduating college seniors, graduate students, young professionals and artists to study, research and/or teach English in participating countries around the world for one year.

› Duval schools face critical teacher shortage
Members of the Duval County Public Schools human resources department were beaming inside Sandalwood High School last week. Following a job fair hosted at the school, they successfully hired 145 teachers and 86 paraprofessionals June 7 — but they still need a lot more. According to the school district, 400 more teachers need to be hired before the 2019-2020 school year.

Tags: Education eNews

Previous Education Updates:

Digital Access

DIRECT DIGITAL ACCESS
Add digital to your current subscription, purchase a single digital issue, or start a new subscription to Florida Trend.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
An overview of the features and articles in this month's issue of Florida Trend.

ACCESS THIS ISSUE »

Education Video Pick

Retiring Santa Fe College president held his last state of the college address
Retiring Santa Fe College president held his last state of the college address

At the Charley Johns Conference in Starke, an economist from the Florida Chamber Foundation gave the keynote presentation about Florida's economy and how the college plays a role in it. Staff from the college offered gifts to retiring Santa Fe College President Jackson Sasser and shared their goodbyes.

Education Videos | Viewpoints@FloridaTrend

Ballot Box

What are your thoughts on the dockless electric scooter boom cropping up across Florida cities?

  • Good alternative for people without a car
  • Cheaper than public transportation
  • Requires more city regulations
  • Eco-friendly alternative
  • They litter city sidewalks and landscapes
  • Battery life questionable
  • Other (Please comment in comment section below)

See Results

Florida Trend Magazine
490 1st Ave S
St Petersburg, FL 33701
727.821.5800

© Copyright 2019 Trend Magazines Inc. All rights reserved.