November 27, 2022
Dr. Fadi Matar

Dr. Fadi Matar, medical director of Tampa General's cardiac care catheterization lab department: Patients "typically can go home in a day or two" after trans-catheter aortic valve replacement.

Photo: Tampa General Hospital

Dr. Fadi Matar Surgery
Dr. Fadi Matar, medical director of Tampa General's cardiac care catheterization lab department: Patients "typically can go home in a day or two" after trans-catheter aortic valve replacement.

Photo: Tampa General Hospital

Cardiac Care in Florida

Avoiding surgery

Jason Garcia | 8/8/2017

In 1985, Tampa General Hospital became the first hospital in Florida to perform a successful heart transplant. Since then, the hospital has done 1,302 additional transplants and implanted 595 ventricular assist devices, or VADs. U.S. News & World Report has ranked Tampa General among the top 50 hospitals in the country for cardiology and heart surgery for nine consecutive years.

The hospital performs a range of complex surgeries and treats high-risk patients that many other hospitals cannot. It also has increased the number of procedures that can be performed through catheterization rather than surgery.

The hospitals’ six cath labs deploy stents, replace valves, plug holes and clip leaks, among other procedures, says Dr. Fadi Matar, medical director of Tampa General’s cath lab and an associate professor of medicine at the University of South Florida. Less invasive procedures are crucial for certain vulnerable populations, such as elderly patients or people dealing with multiple severe diseases or conditions.

The difference is striking. For instance, when Tampa General performs a trans-catheter aortic valve replacement, the patient “typically can go home in a day or two, instead of getting openheart surgery and staying in the hospital for a week or more,” Matar says.

The hospital is currently participating in a trial evaluating the use of a type of clip delivered via catheter to treat patients who have defective mitral valves but who are not candidates for surgery because their hearts are so weak that the surgery could prove fatal. The catheter procedure does not require doctors to temporarily stop the patient’s heart. The trial will evaluate up to 555 subjects over five years.

Read more stories in Florida Trend's series on
» Cardiac Care in Florida

 

See other stories from Florida Trend's August issue.

Get Florida Trend's August magazine – print or digital. Select from these options:

EXISTING
DIGITAL
SUBSCRIBERS

Access Article Now!

DIGITAL
SINGLE
ISSUE

Get a single DIGITAL copy of this issue

$4.95

PRINT
SINGLE
ISSUE

Get a single PRINT copy of this issue

$4.95
plus $3 postage & handling

PRINT SUBSCRIPTION

One year in PRINT

$14.98*
plus a FREE gift!

DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION

One year DIGITAL

$14.98*
plus a FREE gift!

ALL ACCESS SUBSCRIPTION

One year Combo
PRINT + DIGITAL

$24.95*
plus a FREE gift!


CURRENT  PRINT  SUBSCRIBERS

If you are already a print subscriber,
ADD DIGITAL EDITION ACCESS
to your existing subscription here!
(or call our office at 727-892-2643)

* offer valid for new subscribers only

Tags: Cardiac Care

Florida Business News

Florida News Releases

Florida Trend Video Pick

Orlando organizations donate food in Eatonville ahead of Thanksgiving
Orlando organizations donate food in Eatonville ahead of Thanksgiving

The Orlando Magic, alongside nonprofits, churches and other groups, teamed up Monday to help families ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday.

Video Picks | Viewpoints@FloridaTrend

Ballot Box

Is it your opinion that the coronavirus pandemic has ended in the United States?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Unsure
  • Need more information
  • Other (Please share your comments in the comment section below)

See Results

Florida Trend Media Company
490 1st Ave S
St Petersburg, FL 33701
727.821.5800

© Copyright 2022 Trend Magazines Inc. All rights reserved.