February 28, 2015

Community Portrait

Tallahassee - A Community Portrait

An In-Depth Look at Florida's Capital

Charlotte Crane | 10/1/2010

Why I Live Here

I am a third-generation Tallahassean who grew up here, spent 12 years away for college and professional opportunities, and chose to move home six years ago because I wanted to be part of something bigger. I wanted to be a part of the community that exists here — a sense of community I felt was lacking in larger cities like Washington, D.C., and Boston. It’s a city where the vast majority is trying to make it stronger and better. It’s a city whose leaders tend not to take themselves too seriously and who view humility as a virtue. It’s a city whose residents care deeply about family and also about those around them.


I choose to live in Tallahassee because it’s progressive in its thinking about tomorrow, yet traditional in its values, and is constantly growing in a way that makes us more than just a hub for state government and a place to attend college. While government and academia drive our economy, there is also an entrepreneurial spirit here that makes Tallahassee a rewarding place to do business. It has a diverse workforce, yet it’s a place where you typically know the person you pass on the sidewalk. And it has a strong sense of history that drives the culture of our community and makes me proud to call Tallahassee home.

— Emory Mayfield
Vice president of institutional lending
Capital City Bank

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Gov Scott has proposed to increase funding to education, and half of those monies will come from property taxes. The debate is: A) is Scott's proposal a tax? Or, B) is Scott just using new monies that would come in because property values are increasing?

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