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September 20, 2017
New immunotherapy research in Florida shows promise against brain tumors, sepsis

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New immunotherapy research in Florida shows promise against brain tumors, sepsis

| 8/22/2017

New immunotherapy research in Florida shows promise against brain tumors, sepsis

Researchers in Florida are using immunotherapy against two of the toughest medical problems: glioblastoma brain tumors and infections from sepsis and septic shock. Both conditions are deadly and fast-moving. New updates:

  • This week, University of Florida Health researchers announced they have found a way to target a molecule that lets glioblastoma cancer tumors grow, migrate and evade the body’s immune system. The immunotherapy treatment shows effectiveness against deadly brain tumor during early tests. Full story here.
  • UF researchers are also in the news this week because they are part of a nationwide clinical trial to evaluate whether an anti-cancer medication can be effective against sepsis. Sepsis blunts the immune system in ways similar to some kinds of cancer through the protein PD-1. Nivolumab, an immunotherapy drug approved by the FDA for certain types of lung cancer, blocks PD-1. The clinical trial seeks to determine whether blocking PD-1 can also boost the immune system in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Full story here.

Related story, from Florida Trend:
» Cancer care: The limits of immunotherapy

Poll: Hispanics lack confidence in nursing homes

Hispanics in the United States have a longer life expectancy, but a poll finds few older Latinos in Florida and around the nation are confident that nursing homes and assisted living facilities can meet their needs. [Source: AP]

Florida deputies use special software to track opioid overdoses

As an opioid epidemic tightens its grip on towns, cities, counties and states across the country, one Florida law enforcement agency is turning to tech to try to stem the tide locally and prevent the rise of heroin overdoses. [Source: Health News Florida]

Too few patients follow the adage when it comes to health care: Shop around

Despite having more financial “skin in the game” than ever, many consumers don’t make any attempt to compare prices for health care services, a newly released study found. [Source: Kaiser Health News]

Pediatricians say Florida hurt sick kids to help big GOP donors

In the spring and summer of 2015, the state switched more than 13,000 children out of a highly respected program called Children's Medical Services, or CMS, a part of Florida Medicaid. Children on this plan have serious health problems including birth defects, heart disease, diabetes and blindness. More from CNN, Florida Politics, and Health News Florida.

ALSO AROUND FLORIDA:

› How a Miami tech company is bringing the doctor’s office into the digital age
This year, CareCloud, the Miami-based healthcare technology company that provides a software platform for high-performing medical groups, has recently added two executives to its C-suite.

› Florida Hospital New Smyrna opens doors to med students
Back to school brought new meaning to Florida Hospital New Smyrna. For the first time in the hospital’s history, third- and fourth-year medical students this summer began clinical rotations at the Southeast Volusia hospital.

› Orlando Health revamping pediatric neurology services
Orlando Health is revamping its pediatric neurology and neurosurgery programs at its Winnie Palmer and Arnold Palmer hospitals in downtown Orlando, aiming to offer state-of-the-art procedures, such as fetal surgery.

› Law firm investigating Florida children’s insurance scandal
A law firm is investigating claims that an insurer engaged in securities fraud. The investigation is being undertaken by the Pomerantz Law Firm on behalf of investors in UnitedHealth Group.

» Go to page 2 for more health care stories in your region

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