October 22, 2014

Sales and Marketing Advice for Florida business

How to create a powerful and effective marketing message

Ron Stein | 4/20/2014

Why are marketing messages difficult to get just right? I never thought it would be so hard to do. It took me a little time and even then I tweak it now and then. Some people I speak with tell me that after ten years in business they still don’t have a marketing message they’re happy with.

Here’s what I think -- many people see marketing as a big mystery. Overwhelming too.

This is what happens next. With the urge to nail down a powerful and clear differentiator companies end up trying everything they can to stand out to grab the attention of anyone who just might listen.

They overreact and end up trying too hard in their marketing approach. And a “message” of sorts gets blasted out. Ironically, the harder people try to develop that perfect marketing message, the less effective their marketing is.

Your buyers simply want to know if you, or anyone out there, can get them from where they are to where they want to be -- and have their best interests in mind.

But, a marketing message that rattles off your company’s triumphs and the features of your offering will only have buyers tuning you out.

The best way to recalibrate your message is to stop marketing. Well, not entirely. Just don’t try marketing so hard.

In order for your audience to believe and trust you really can help them move to a place that will improve their lives and that you have their best interests in mind, they must see you as a champion on their behalf.

Look outward. Analyze and dissect the markets you serve and develop a profile of the ideal buyers in your target market and any segments. Determine where they are, their challenges, the solutions they’re looking for, and why it’s important to them.

Be an advocate for your buyers. Make a list of how your products or services conquer your customer’s problems or create new opportunities for them. Dig deep and uncover what's truly important and what keeps the people you serve from reaching their goals. Show them how you'll help by truly aligning your offering and their needs in a way that highlights your offering's competitive uniqueness.

Creating a core message really isn’t hard. Now, build a message that speaks to how you serve your market. The next step is to create a core marketing message which you should think about as a multipurpose launching pad for all of your communications. It’s the “core” message from which you can create different marketing statements to fit diverse situations. Such as what you’ll say use when someone asks you what your company does. Or, the way you introduce yourself at networking meetings. Or, the top-level headline on your website’s homepage. Or, your tagline. Adapt and mold it as needed.

Champions seek two-way conversations. An effective introduction to your business must facilitate a real dialog -- in your emails, one-on-one talks, and on your website too. Launching into a three-minute monologue or a thousand word email just won’t hack it. For instance, construct your business introduction in such a way that there are pauses and places for you and the other person to ask questions. Peak their interest. Information should flow in two directions. This is one of the best ways to build trust.

Consistency counts. No matter what the approach is and how you’re using your core marketing message, have a common tone. Part of this of course is how your message flows through everything you do -- tagline, letterhead, PowerPoint template, website, and email. Yet, it is just as important that the message is second nature for everyone in your organization, including vendors and partners. But, don’t leave it to them. Make sure everyone understands your core message and the variations that are used when spoken and written.

Marketing messages are important to you and your business. It may feel challenging and take some time to get it right, yet it’s worth the effort. Creating a great message doesn’t have to be tricky.

Help people get where they want to go. It’s all right to have a set of talking points, but you’ll attract more interest when everything you say and write is centered on your buyer.

Don’t be boring. Get to the point quickly and from the buyer’s perspective. You are not marketing, but fighting for your buyer -- letting them know that they don’t have to face their problem alone.


Ron Stein is President of FastPath Marketing (www.marketing-strategies-guide.com) and the author of the Rapid Impact Marketing & Selling Playbook. As a speaker, coach, and consultant he works with small business owners helping them to accelerate the path between their vision and the actions needed to reach, win, and keep customers. Ron is the creator of the FastPath to More Customers Now! 7-step marketing system based on more than twenty years as a successful business owner, corporate CEO, business development executive, and salesman. He is also a mentor at two nationally recognized business accelerators. Ron offers one-on-one and small group mentoring, conducts seminars, and consults. He can be reached at 727-398-1855 or Ron@FastPathMarketing.com.

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