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Florida teachers sue governor, education department over plans to reopen schools

Florida teachers sue governor, education department over plans to reopen schools

The Florida Education Association, a union representing 145,000 educators, filed a lawsuit on Monday against Governor Ron DeSantis and the state's Department of Education in an attempt to stop schools from reopening at the end of August. The lawsuit argues Florida's plan to reopen schools is unsafe due to the coronavirus pandemic, and therefore violates the state constitution. More from CBS News, NPR, and WTSP.

See also:
» 'Have at it': Gov. DeSantis OKs school districts opening later to ensure safety

Where does the Florida Lottery money go?

A lottery was approved by Florida voters in 1986 through a constitutional amendment that would set aside a portion of proceeds for public education. When the Florida Lottery first started, funds were broken down as follows: 50 percent prizes, 35 percent public schools, 5 percent retailer’s commission and 10 percent operating costs. Currently, 65 percent of proceeds go to prizes. Then 26.9 percent are added to the state’s Educational Enhancement Trust Fund. [Source: Tampa Bay Times]

Students at UCF, other state universities weigh options for return to campus

Students at UCF and other state universities are weighing whether to live at home this fall or move back into apartments or dorms, even though most or all of their classes will be online. Challenges come with whatever decision they make, from concerns about how safe campus will be to apartments not willing to budge on breaking leases. [Source: Orlando Sentinel]

USF launches a new research project: explore systemic racism

The University of South Florida on Monday announced the creation of a task force that will launch and oversee a year-long series of research projects aimed at exploring systemic racism and finding solutions to the problem. The university has created a $500,000 fund from the provost’s office and the research and innovation office to support the first round of research projects. [Source: Tampa Bay Times]

Another semester at Edward Waters College? Admin says they’ll pay the bill

For students returning to Edward Waters College in fall, administrators know things are going to look a lot different than they did last spring when the coronavirus pandemic was just starting to hit Jacksonville. And they want to help — so they’re paying the bill. As part of a new campaign called #WeGotYou, school officials announced Friday that returning eligible students’ financial balances for fall 2020 and spring 2021 fees will be waived with the help of increased state funding. [Source: ]

ALSO AROUND FLORIDA:

› UF students, get used to this topic: artificial intelligence
The University of Florida on Tuesday announced a $70 million partnership that will bring artificial intelligence to the forefront of the school’s technology programs and introduce the topic more broadly to the student body.

› Florida Tech garners international recognition for diversity, highest-ranked institution in Florida
Florida Tech was recognized for a host of strengths in the 2020 rankings from the respected international agency Round University Ranking, including international diversity, natural sciences and teaching. Known for its rich global diversity, Florida Tech was ranked in the top-tier Diamond League in the 2020 RUR International Diversity Ranking, appearing at No. 63 out of 813 universities from around the world. It was the highest-ranked institution in Florida.

› How the Gardiner and McKay scholarships can help Florida students with disabilities
Finding the right educational setting for a child with disabilities can be both challenging and costly. Fortunately, if you live in the state of Florida and have a child with a defined disability, there’s help. The Gardiner and McKay Scholarships give families educational options and assistance with those expenses.

› A $3.7 million purchase spotlights Hillsborough school superintendent
Late last month, Hillsborough County superintendent Addison Davis secured School Board approval for a $3.7 million learning materials purchase from Achieve3000, a New Jersey company that employs his brother in an executive job.