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August 22, 2019
New plan would train Florida doctors about human trafficking

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New plan would train Florida doctors about human trafficking

| 7/30/2019

New plan would train Florida doctors about human trafficking

A state panel next week will consider whether to approve a Florida Medical Association course on human trafficking as a continuing-education requirement for doctors. The Board of Medicine Rules and Legislative Committee will consider the FMA’s request for course approval when the panel meets in Coral Gables. The Legislature this year passed a human trafficking bill, which, among other things, requires physicians to take one continuing-education credit in issues related to human trafficking. More from CBS Miami and Health News Florida.

Physician fees a sore subject as telehealth moves forward

The Florida panel that regulates medical doctors will begin putting in place rules this week that are designed to make the state’s new telehealth law a reality. But physicians who serve on the Florida Board of Medicine will have no say over one of the most-contentious parts of the law: registration costs for out-of-state doctors who can use telehealth to begin caring for Florida residents. [Source: WUSF]

International students face mental health problems. What can Florida do?

Many international students come from backgrounds where mental health is not talked about, so they hold in their stress or talk about it only with friends. Often, struggling international students may go to a primary care doctor instead and present their symptoms, said Karen Hofmann, the director of UCF’s Counseling and Psychological Services. Doctors then have to refer students to the counseling center. [Source: Tampa Bay Times]

Gov. DeSantis vows ‘vigorous’ scrutiny of guardianship program

Gov. Ron DeSantis vowed to “vigorously” investigate Florida’s guardianship program after revelations that a 75-year-old man died when a Tampa hospital was barred from attempting to save his life because his appointed guardian had filed a “do not resuscitate” order, allegedly without his family’s consent. [Source: ]

Florida Hospital Association eyes ER Supreme Court case

The Florida Hospital Association will weigh in as the state Supreme Court considers whether a hospital can be liable for treatment provided by emergency-room doctors who are independent contractors. The Supreme Court on Friday approved a request from the association to file a a friend-of-the-court brief on behalf of Doctors Hospital in a Miami-Dade County case. [Source: ]

ALSO AROUND FLORIDA:

› Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital earns nursing excellence recognition
The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) named Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital as a Magnet® designated hospital today. The recognition is considered the highest nursing honor a hospital can receive. There are only 498 Magnet hospitals across the world and fewer than eight percent of U.S. hospitals have received the designation.

› Sylvester Center’s new designation comes with big benefits for cancer patients
Cancer patients in South Florida will benefit from a prestigious designation earned by the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at University of Miami that comes with access to more clinical trials, cancer research and experimental therapies. Sylvester announced on Monday that the National Cancer Institute has recognized the hospital for its research efforts and cutting-edge cancer treatments.

› FSU College of Medicine receives $3.75M grant to continue improving care for older adults in Florida
With a $3.75 million grant from the federal Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the Department of Geriatrics at the Florida State University College of Medicine will help shape the future of health care in Florida. Florida’s older adult population will number almost 7 million by 2040 and is typically challenged by chronic illness and high numbers of medications.

› Bayfront Health St. Petersburg ramps up efforts to collect patient debt
Hundreds of patients have been sued by Bayfront Health St. Petersburg in recent years as the hospital evolved from a nonprofit institution to a for-profit arm of a national chain. The number of patients sued individually in Pinellas County civil and small claims court has risen from about 500 in 2015 to more than 730 so far this year, putting the hospital on pace to double that number by the end of 2019

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