August 21, 2014
Fuel cells 101

The most common type of fuel cell is the PEM, short for proton exchange membrane. The membrane is a material that resembles kitchen plastic wrap.

Photo: Jeff Papa

Fuel cells 101

As air flows into one side of the fuel cell, hydrogen is fed into the other. The hydrogen interacts with a platinum-coated cloth or paper and splits into electrons and protons.

Photo: Jeff Papa

Fuel cells 101

Protons pass through the membrane. Electrons cannot pass through; instead, they form an electrical current that travels through an external circuit, powering a motor or device.

Photo: Jeff Papa

Fuel cells 101

Oxygen in the air combines with the electrons and protons from the hydrogen fuel, creating exhaust in the form of water and heat. 

Photo: Jeff Papa

Research Florida

Fuel Cell Science

Bing Energy — founded on the work of FSU researchers — offers a tantalizing glimpse into a hydrogen-powered future.

Lilly Rockwell | 5/27/2014

At its most basic, a hydrogen fuel cell is just a device that allows substances to combine chemically, without burning, to produce electricity.

Most fuel cells look like small boxes composed of densely packed layers of a cloth-like material and metal or plastic. Hydrogen, the fuel, flows in through a port on one side and oxygen through a port on the other.

Those two gases, which can’t combine without help, meet in the presence of a catalyst, most commonly platinum, that’s embedded in the cell’s layers.

The chemical reaction that ensues produces electricity; the cell keeps generating power as long as the hydrogen and oxygen keep flowing. Most appealing: The only byproducts are a tiny bit of heat — and water.

Two of the main hurdles in turning hydrogen fuel cells into the power source of the future for cars and other commercial applications include the amount and cost of platinum — about $1,400 an ounce — and the cost and difficulty of producing large quantities of hydrogen, which has to be extracted from water, natural gas or plant materials and then distributed through networks of fueling stations.

Fuel Cells 101
In a fuel cell, hydrogen fuel isn’t burned. Instead, it reacts chemically with components inside the cell to produce electricity. The most common type of fuel cell is the PEM, short for proton exchange membrane. The membrane is a material that resembles kitchen plastic wrap.

» As air flows into one side of the fuel cell, hydrogen is fed into the other. The hydrogen interacts with a platinum-coated cloth or paper and splits into electrons, which have a negative electrical charge, and protons, which are positively charged.

» The protons pass through the membrane. The electrons cannot pass through the membrane. Instead, they form an electrical current that travels through an external circuit, powering a motor or other device.

» The oxygen in the air combines with the electrons and protons from the hydrogen fuel, creating exhaust in the form of water and heat.

Tags: Energy & Utilities, Environment, Research & Development, Technology/Innovation, Transportation, Research Florida, Hydrogen Hopes

Digital Access

DIRECT DIGITAL ACCESS
Add digital to your current subscription, purchase a single ditgital issue, or start a new subscription to Florida Trend.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
An overview of the features and articles in this month's issue of Florida Trend.

ACCESS THIS ISSUE »

Florida Business News

Florida Trend Video Pick

Balloon sculpture at Museum of Fine Arts will blow you away
Balloon sculpture at Museum of Fine Arts will blow you away

If you've ever been impressed by a balloon animal, prepare to be blown away by a new art exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts in St. Petersburg made up entirely of balloons.

Earlier Videos | Viewpoints@FloridaTrend

Ballot Box

Should the Feds stop sending so much surplus military weapons and armored trucks to local police?

  • Yes, enough already
  • No, every force should be prepared for the worst

See Results

Ballot Box
Subscribe