August 12, 2022
Dean Minardi

Bing CFO Dean Minardi shows off an electric vehicle that gets its primary power from electricity stored in batteries. 

Photo: Jon M. Fletcher

Hydrogen fuel cell

Hydrogen fuel cell

Photo: Jon M. Fletcher

Hydrogen fuel tank

Hydrogen fuel tank

Photo: Jon M. Fletcher

Research Florida

A new kind of hybrid

Bing Energy — founded on the work of FSU researchers — offers a tantalizing glimpse into a hydrogen-powered future.

Lilly Rockwell | 5/27/2014

Bing Energy, for the foreseeable future, will market its fuel cells only as range extenders for electric vehicles powered by batteries. The fuel cell (above left) is located under the car’s hood. The hydrogen that powers the fuel cell is stored in a tank in the vehicle’s trunk area. In the future, some vehicles may be powered entirely by electricity generated by the fuel cells, with no need for batteries. Recently, several major vehicle manufacturers have announced plans to sell fuel-cell-powered vehicles in the U.S. There are only two fuel-cell vehicles available in the U.S. currently: Honda’s FCX Clarity and the Mercedes-Benz F-Cell. But this year Hyundai began offering a fuel-cell version of its Tucson sport utility vehicle this year. And Honda and Toyota are expected to release fuel-cell cars next year.

The fuel-cell frenzy is driven by an attempt to meet California’s requirement that 15% of vehicles sold in the state be zero-emission vehicles by 2025.

Tags: Energy & Utilities, Environment, Research & Development, Technology/Innovation, Transportation, Research Florida, Hydrogen Hopes

Florida Business News

Florida Trend Video Pick

Rays pitcher JP Feyereisen encourages Tampa Bay area kids to read
Rays pitcher JP Feyereisen encourages Tampa Bay area kids to read

Rays pitcher JP Feyereisen reads with kids at the Largo Public Library as part of the "Reading with the Rays" program. The event hits close to home for Feyereisen, who went to school to be a teacher and plans to become a teacher and coach once his baseball career is over.

Video Picks | Viewpoints@FloridaTrend

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