April 24, 2014

A Florida TaxWatch industry report

Fishing in Florida: A $5 billion dollar business

The economic impact fishing has on Florida.

| 8/27/2013

Sportsmen Pay for Conservation

According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWCC), Florida generated $9.4 million dollars in freshwater licenses, and $26.8 million dollars in saltwater licenses in FY2011-12.3

About 30 percent of the freshwater license revenues and about 46 percent saltwater license revenues were collected from non-residents. The revenue generated from these licenses is vital for the conservation of Florida fisheries, as it ensures continued success of this industry in our state by keeping fish populations at sustainable levels.

fishingcapital.com includes several articles and recommendations on popular fishing sites, tours, and deals.

Nationally, there is a federal excise tax on fishing gear, boats and boat fuel that contributes $390 million annually to the Sport Fish Restoration and Boating Trust Fund for conservation efforts around the U.S. Anglers also donate more than $400 million each year to conservation and fishing organizations that protect and develop quality habitat to ensure quality fishing opportunities.


Getting more people “hooked” on fishing

In an effort to introduce more people to fishing, the FWCC allowed for two license-free saltwater fishing dates in 2013. The first was held on June 1, and another will take place on Sunday, September 1. A license-free freshwater day was also allowed on June 8. In addition, the FWCC organized several activities across the state in June, Visit Florida’s Fishing Month. Some of these activities included dockside outreach, where staff talked to the public at several boat ramps and docks about saltwater fishing. The staff also welcomed tourists at the welcome centers on major Florida interstates, and offered a women’s fishing clinic. Season and size restrictions are still enforced during the license-free days.

The FWCC also offers saltwater fishing clinics for children ages 5-15 and their parents. With the goal of creating “responsible marine resource stewards,” the clinics teach children how to cast, tie knots, tackle fish, and the importance of becoming an ethical angler. The clinics also include a “touch tank” session for children to learn about marine animals and how they interact in their habitats. These clinics are funded by the Sport Fish Restoration Program, a national program managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which uses revenue generated by the federal excise taxes to purchase fishing items.4

This Florida TaxWatch report is also available in PDF format:
"Florida: The Fishing Capital of the World"

The International Game & Fish Association Museum

Florida is so important to the sportfishing industry that the International Game and Fish Association (IGFA) headquarters has been located in Florida since the 1950s. It has resided in Miami, Fort Lauderdale, Pompano Beach, and moved in 1999 to Dania Beach.

The IGFA museum in Dania Beach houses the headquarters as well as the Hall of Fame and a 60,000 square foot Muesum. Founded in 1939, the IGFA supports scientific research into fisheries, is a proponent of aquatic habitat conservation, and has been the official keeper of saltwater world records since its founding. IGFA took over the freshwater record registry when Field & Stream handed over its 68 years of records in 1978.

Tags: Environment, Travel & Tourism, Florida TaxWatch

Digital Access

DIRECT DIGITAL ACCESS
Add digital to your current subscription, purchase a single ditgital issue, or start a new subscription to Florida Trend.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
An overview of the features and articles in this month's issue of Florida Trend.

ACCESS THIS ISSUE »

Florida Business News

Florida Trend Video Pick

Rising Tide Car Wash
Rising Tide Car Wash

John D’Eri co-founded the Rising Tide Car Wash to show what his son and others on the autism spectrum can accomplish. Click video to view and see our profile here.

Earlier Videos | Viewpoints@FloridaTrend

Ballot Box

How quickly must we act to protect Florida's dying springs?

  • Immediately - Florida's House and Senate must pass SB 1576
  • Not a priority - issue can be postponed
  • This shouldn't even be on the agenda

See Results

Ballot Box
Subscribe